The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree

Idiom

The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree

Definition

The idiom “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” is used to refer to the fact that a person’s traits or qualities are often similar to those of their parents.

Examples

He must be smart because the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

Her artistic talent comes from her parents – the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

Origin

The origin of this phrase dates back to the 16th century where it was first used in a proverb by John Heywood.

FAQs

Question

What does the idiom “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” mean?

Answer

The idiom “The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” means that a person’s traits or qualities are often similar to those of their parents.

Question

What is the origin of this phrase?

Answer

The origin of this phrase dates back to the 16th century where it was first used in a proverb by John Heywood.