A rose is a rose is a rose

Idiom

A rose is a rose is a rose

Definition

This idiom is used to emphasize that something is exactly what it seems, and that no other interpretation should be drawn from it.

Examples

No matter what you call it, a rose is still a rose.

A rose is a rose is a rose, no matter what you call it.

No matter what you name it, a rose remains a rose.

Origin

This phrase was originally written by American poet Gertrude Stein in her poem Sacred Emily in 1913.

FAQs

What does the idiom ‘A rose is a rose is a rose’ mean?

The phrase ‘A rose is a rose is a rose’ means that something is exactly what it seems, and that no other interpretation should be drawn from it.

Where did the phrase ‘A rose is a rose is a rose’ originate from?

The phrase ‘A rose is a rose is a rose’ originated from the poem ‘Sacred Emily’ written by American poet Gertrude Stein in 1913.