A house of cards

Idiom

A house of cards

Definition

A house of cards is an expression used to describe a fragile or delicate situation that can easily collapse. It can also refer to something built on a weak foundation that is easily blown away.

Examples

The company’s financial stability is like a house of cards, so we need to be careful.

Their marriage is a house of cards and it’s only a matter of time before it falls apart.

Origin

The phrase ‘a house of cards’ was first used in the novel Pamela by Samuel Richardson in 1740. It was derived from the game of card-house which was popular at the time.

FAQs

Q: What does ‘a house of cards’ mean? A: It is an expression used to describe a fragile or delicate situation that can easily collapse.

Q: Where did the phrase ‘a house of cards’ originate? A: The phrase ‘a house of cards’ was first used in the novel Pamela by Samuel Richardson in 1740.